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by Peter Moskos

September 15, 2009

John Hopkins student kills intruder with sword

"A Johns Hopkins University student armed with a samurai sword killed an intruder in his garage, Baltimore police said Tuesday." The AP story by Ben Nuckols. [Thanks to DJK!]

Sept 20 Update: There's a story by Justin Fenton with new info here.

13 comments:

DJK said...

Damn...not even any credit for sending you the link. No love. ;)

DJK said...

It's a good thing he didn't use a gun...he might have been suspended. ;)

Well done Mr. Sword Wielder Man....well done. One less scumbag on the street.

PCM said...

My fault! I was late for school and in a rush...

Anonymous said...

In the story on CNN, it says the police are determining if the student will face criminal charges. If he did, I think that would send the wrong message to the public that protecting yourself is a crime and that criminals are protected more from the law than the good person.

PCM said...

I doubt police will charge the guy. Not unless he ran down after the street chasing after the burglar before swinging at him.

I have a question for somebody. If somebody climes over a locked gate into a backyard and then forces entry into a garage that is *not* connected to a home and steals stuff... is that burglary or just theft, trespassing, and destruction of property? Do you actually have to break into the place of residence for it to be burglary or just be on the property and passed some barrier? I can't remember. (And of course it probably depends on the state. Specifically I'm asking about Illinois. But I'll take anywhere.)

DJK said...

http://www.examiner.com/x-1417-Gun-Rights-Examiner~y2009m9d16-Johns-Hopkins-advises-surrender-not-swords?cid=exrss-Gun-Rights-Examiner

DJK said...

On the property is trespass. B&E would be Burglary, no?

But when the guy went to see what was up...and the guy threatened him it became robbery.

Man...those criminal law classes were a LONG time ago...

DJK said...

Johns Hopkins Policy states:


I. The unauthorized use, possession, or storage of any weapons, chemicals, or explosives, including fireworks, on university property.


This prohibition also extends to any person who may have acquired a government-issued permit or license. Violation of this regulation will result in disciplinary action and sanctions up to and including expulsion, in the case of students, or termination of employment, in the case of faculty and staff.

Anonymous said...

Peter, in Illinois "Burglary" is defined as entry into any building for the purpose of committing a felony. It is a Class 2 Felony punishable by up to 7 years in jail. "Residential Burglary" is defined as entry into the residential dwelling portion of a building, so not a detached garage or even a common lobby, and is a Class 1 Felony punishable by up to 15 years in jail. -- Cousin Jimmy in Chicago

Anonymous said...

Also should mention that Illinois has a justifiable use of force statute that lays out when and how you can defend yourself or your property with force, including deadly force. Here's a link to the statute: http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?DocName=072000050HArt%2E+7&ActID=1876&ChapAct=720%26nbsp%3BILCS%26nbsp%3B5%2F&ChapterID=53&ChapterName=CRIMINAL+OFFENSES&SectionID=60595&SeqStart=7800000&SeqEnd=9300000&ActName=Criminal+Code+of+1961%2E

PCM said...

Well, if you know the answer, Cousin Jimmy, I guess there's no need for me to be asking! Now go practice your sword skills.

Thank you, all.

IrishPirate said...

Being that it would be inappropriate to make jokes at the untimely demise of the burglar I won't.

Although, I did find it an interesting slice of life story.

It slices, it dices, now how much would you pay?

I apologize. I blame society and my parents.

Marc S. said...

I've been reading around and I've seen some comments that local Baltimore news is reporting that they are charging the student. Haven't seen a source yet though. It wouldn't surprise me considering it was in a detached garage and they'll probably say that he should have stayed in the house and let the police handle it.

Furthermore, the US, unlike most of the world, has a aversion towards edged weapons and killing someone with a blade is considered exceptionally savage. If you're in the right, it shouldn't matter, but unfortunately, the system treats you more harshly if you hack someone up with a sword than if you put a load of buckshot in them (even if the results are the same).