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by Peter Moskos

December 12, 2010

Brand Name: Fail

Last night I poured myself a big frosty mug of LECH.

I couldn't resist buying this the other day. (So maybe the name is actually a stroke of marketing genius.) It tasted just fine.


Thinking CAP said...

I guess it's better than "lecher."

But considering the last two syllables of the brewery are "polski" I feel I can safely assume it originates in Poland.

I'm not sure what Lech means, but I know their first elected president was named that.

Maria said...

Lemme unlurk and jump in on this one. Lech was one of three legendary brothers who founded the region known as Poland (the other two founding Russia and Bohemia.)

It's a very popular name for boys (hence why two recent presidents have been called Lech).

The CH is pronounced kinda like an H sound, as in "My beer goggles make you look Hot!" and not as in "The name of this beer makes me Chortle." :P

PCM said...

Thanks for the lesson!

(though I still think they should consider re-branding for the American market).

Thinking CAP said...

So I guess our Amerikanner journalists didn't pronounce it as guttural as it should be? I'd always thought I'd heard it as "lek."

The background Maria gives makes me wonder about the origins of "this town ain't big enough for the both of us."

Maria said...

Could be more like 'Lek'. My polish accent is so rusty you'd need a tetanus shot if exposed to it.

Heh. "this town ain't big enough for the both of us." Oddly, I've always thought about Romulus and Remus with that phrase.

Thinking CAP said...

I was trying to work those Star Trek characters into a joke but gave up. ;-)

Mainly because, as I'm sure you know, Romulus and Remus founded Rome together. Although I am not an expert on their story and perhaps they had a falling out later.